The use of solar energy to generate electricity is already widespread. Today’s established and commonly used solar cells are based on the raw material silicon. Although silicon is present in large quantities on earth, it must be processed in an energy-intensive manner for use in solar cells. In the Solarhaus of the University of Applied Sciences Lübeck (THL), we are researching attractive alternatives. The aim is to be able to use solar energy more economically and sustainably. With dye- sensitized solar cells, in which naturally occurring dyes from microalgae are embedded, we make use of the principle of photosynthesis.
Prototypes of this technology, which is still to be researched and developed, are to be presented at least outside the evaluation at the HDU in Wuppertal.
In particular, the naturally occurring tetrapyrrole dyes are particularly suitable for the production of efficient dye-sensitized solar cells, as they represent the functional building blocks of the natural photosynthetic system of plants and (micro-) algae. The dyes have practically not been investigated in such applications so far. Our research and development work is therefore necessary in order to provide such dyes and the corresponding cell technology allowing them to work in stable and efficient manner. Our interest in dye sensitized solar cells is also fuelled by the relatively high sensitivity to diffuse light and a simple and compact design.
Algae for dye-sensitized solar cells

Artificial sun - The Solar Simulator

The solar simulator allows to evaluate the performance of the solar cells. It is a lamp closely imitating the real spectrum of our sun at the earth surface at varying illumination conditions (sunny or cloudy days at different day times etc.). The solar simulator is structured as follows. It consists of: darkened chamber | light source | computer with the company software | power supply | measuring terminals | height-adjustable sample table The light source of the solar simulator can generate different solar spectra with different irradiances, which allows the solar cells to be measured under different irradiances. The company software enables the fully automated recording of current-voltage characteristic and calculates the resulting parameters such as the efficiency of the cell. Thus, the cells can be reliably compared with each other.
However, the solar simulator can only provide values for cells under laboratory conditions. For the measurement of the cells under real conditions, the solar house has a self-made outdoor measuring station.
Read more about the solar house >> here
Supported by: on the basis of a decisionby the German Bundestag
The use of solar energy to generate electricity is already widespread. Today’s established and commonly used solar cells are based on the raw material silicon. Although silicon is present in large quantities on earth, it must be processed in an energy-intensive manner for use in solar cells. In the Solarhaus of the University of Applied Sciences Lübeck (THL), we are researching attractive alternatives. The aim is to be able to use solar energy more economically and sustainably. With dye- sensitized solar cells, in which naturally occurring dyes from microalgae are embedded, we make use of the principle of photosynthesis.
not been investigated in such applications so far. Our research and development work is therefore necessary in order to provide such dyes and the corresponding cell technology allowing them to work in stable and efficient manner. Our interest in dye sensitized solar cells is also fuelled by the relatively high sensitivity to diffuse light and a simple and compact design.
In particular, the naturally occurring tetrapyrrole dyes are particularly suitable for the production of efficient dye-sensitized solar cells, as they represent the functional building blocks of the natural photosynthetic system of plants and (micro-) algae. The dyes have practically
Algae for dye-sensitized solar cells

Artificial sun - The Solar Simulator

The solar simulator allows to evaluate the performance of the solar cells. It is a lamp closely imitating the real spectrum of our sun at the earth surface at varying illumination conditions (sunny or cloudy days at different day times etc.). The solar simulator is structured as follows. It consists of: darkened chamber | light source | computer with the company software | power supply | measuring terminals | height-adjustable sample table The light source of the solar simulator can generate different solar spectra with different irradiances, which allows the solar cells to be measured under different irradiances. The company software enables the fully automated recording of current-voltage characteristic and calculates the resulting parameters such as the efficiency of the cell. Thus, the cells can be reliably compared with each other.
However, the solar simulator can only provide values for cells under laboratory conditions. For the measurement of the cells under real conditions, the solar house has a self-made outdoor measuring station.
Read more about the solar house >> here
Prototypes of this technology, which is still to be researched and developed, are to be presented at least outside the evaluation at the HDU in Wuppertal.